Last edited by Talar
Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

5 edition of Muscovite diplomatic practice in the reign of Ivan III found in the catalog.

Muscovite diplomatic practice in the reign of Ivan III

Robert M. Croskey

Muscovite diplomatic practice in the reign of Ivan III

by Robert M. Croskey

  • 175 Want to read
  • 28 Currently reading

Published by Garland Pub. in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Russia
    • Subjects:
    • Diplomatic and consular service, Soviet.,
    • Russia -- Foreign relations -- To 1689.,
    • Russia -- History -- Ivan III, 1462-1505.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementRobert M. Croskey.
      SeriesModern European history
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsDK102 .C76 1987
      The Physical Object
      Paginationviii, 332 p. ;
      Number of Pages332
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2379069M
      ISBN 10082408053X
      LC Control Number87007561

      Only with the reign of Peter I did interdynastic mar modified rituals can be analyzed for insights into Muscovite diplomatic rela tions with its neighbors, and also for hints about the role of ritual and religion the wedding of Elena Ivanovna and Alexander of Lithuania, joined a Muscovite princess, the daughter of Ivan III, to the. Ivan III to Peter the Great, Ph.D. diss. University of Chicago ; and P. B. Brown Muscovite Government Bureaus, in: Russian History/Histoire Russe 10 (), pp.

      Ivan IV., called “the Terrible” (–), tsar of Muscovy, was the son of Vasily [Basil] ich, grand duke of Muscovy, by his second wife, Helena Glinska. Born on the 25th of August , he was proclaimed grand duke on the death of his father (), and took the government into his own hands in , being then fourteen years old. Aleksandr Filjuškin: Vasili j III. Moskva: Molodaja Gvardija, S. ISBN With the exception of A. A. Zimin’s, Rossiia na poroge novogo vremeni () there have been few studies devoted to Vasily III and his reign as grand prince of Muscovy (–). Aleksandr Filiushkin’s Vasilii III seeks to fill that gap.

      The institution of the terem was even reflected in diplomatic practice, particularly in forging marriage alliances. Strict separation was maintained even between the betrothed. For example, during the marriage of Ivan III’s daughter Helena Ivanovna to Alexander, the Grand Duke of Lithuania, it was insisted upon that Helena use her own. The reign of Grand Prince Ivan III (–) represented a period of wide-ranging consolidation of Rusian lands under the aegis of Moscow at the very time that elites were concerned about the Orthodox Christian prediction of an imminent Apocalypse in The semiotics of Muscovite rulership incorporated references to Jerusalem and the End Times long after the predicted date had passed.


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Muscovite diplomatic practice in the reign of Ivan III by Robert M. Croskey Download PDF EPUB FB2

texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK Muscovite diplomatic practice in the reign of Ivan III Item Preview remove-circle Muscovite diplomatic practice in the reign of Ivan III by Croskey, Robert M., Publication date TopicsPages: Add tags for "Muscovite diplomatic practice in the reign of Ivan III".

All user tags (1) View most popular tags as: tag list | tag cloud. Robert M. Croskey, Muscovite Diplomatic Practice in the Reign of Ivan III, page According to Zimin, this individual was in the service of Prince Fedor Vasili'evich Riazanskii as early astwo years after his service on the embassy to the Crimea.

Ivan III Vasilyevich (Russian: Иван III Васильевич; 22 JanuaryMoscow – 27 OctoberMoscow), also known as Ivan the Great, was a Grand Prince of Moscow and Grand Prince of all Rus'.Ivan served as the co-ruler and regent for his blind father Vasily II from the mids before he officially ascended the throne in Sometimes referred to as the "gatherer of the Father: Vasily II of Russia.

Ivan III, Russian in full Ivan Vasilyevich, byname Ivan the Great, Russian Ivan Veliky, (born Jan. 22,Moscow—died Oct. 27,Moscow), grand prince of Moscow (–), who subdued most of the Great Russian lands by conquest or by the voluntary allegiance of princes, rewon parts of Ukraine from Poland–Lithuania, and repudiated.

English citations of Crimea the Crimean khanate []. Robert M. Croskey, Muscovite Diplomatic Practice in the Reign of Ivan III, page [ ] distaste for this particular the first detailed account of the reception of an embassy from the Crimea in Vasilii III's reign, inwe find both the Crimean ambassador, and the representatives of the Grand Prince kneeling [.

Etymology. Although the origins of the terem as a Muscovite practice are still a matter of debate among historians, scholars generally agree that the word itself is derived from the Byzantine Greek word teremnon (Greek:τέρεμνον), meaning chamber or abode.

Its usage in a Russian context has been dated to Kievan times. The word terem is in no way linguistically related to the Arabic word. This book has been cited by the following publications.

“ Reflections on the Boyar Duma in the Reign of Ivan III.” Slavonic and East European Review, vol. 45 (), pp. 76– Robert M. Muscovite Diplomatic Practice in the Reign of Ivan III. New York and London. English Diplomatic Practice in the Middle Ages. London: Hambledon Continuum, _____.

English Medieval Diplomatic Practice. 2 volumes. London: Her Majesty’s Stationery Office, _____. Essays in Medieval Diplomacy and Administr. London: ation Hambledon Press, Croskey, Robert M. Muscovite Diplomatic Practice in the Reign of. In this new book on early modern diplomacy, Jan Hennings explores the relationship between European powers and Russia beyond the conventional East-West divide from the Peace of Westphalia to the reign of Peter the Great.

Ivan IV’s son Tsar Fedor Ivanovich was the first Tsar of Moscow crowned “autocrat” in Nevertheless Ivan did use the word for himself and his son and then designated heir Tsarevich Ivan in official diplomatic correspondence Aleksandr Filiushkin brought these unpublished texts to the attention of scholars In October and.

This revised edition is a concise, yet comprehensive narrative of the history of Russia from the reign of Vladimir I the Saint, through to the reign of Ivan IV the Terrible.

Supplementing the original edition with results of recently published scholarship as well as her own research, Janet Martin emphasizes the dynamics of Russia's political evolution from the loose federation of 1/5(1).

the reign of Ivan III (), the Muscovite state not only retained or strengthened her political and economic relations with neighboring states but also established direct new diplomatic contacts with the Italians, Mordavians, Hungarians and the Germans of the Holy.

Russia - Russia - Romanov Muscovy: The military drive that finally expelled the Poles from Moscow led to the election of Michael (Mikhail Fyodorovich), the year-old son of Fyodor Romanov, as the new tsar.

The composition of the coalition that elected him is not clear, but he evidently represented a compromise between the Cossacks, the boyars (especially the Tushino boyars), and the leaders. Study of Ivan III's use of diplomatic maneuvers in expanding the Muscovite State from to "A study of the reign of Ivan III, Grand Prince of Moscow from to It is intended for historians who know no Russian or who have no access to Russian sources.

Muscovite Diplomatic Practice in the Reign of Ivan III Legacy of Tolstoy: Alexandra Tolstoy and the Soviet Regime in the s Robert Croskey's articles on topics including the Russian period in Alaska, early Anglo -Russian relations, Byzantine Greeks in Russia.

Metropolitan Makarii headed the Russian Orthodox Church from to during the reign of Ivan IV. Most historians agree about his significance for the history of the Church and Muscovite culture.

Tsar Ivan III. AKA Ivan Vasilyevich. Tsar of Russia, Birthplace: Moscow, Russia Location of death: Moscow, Russia Cause of death: unspecified Remains: Buried. Ivan III, Grand Duke of Muscovy, son of Vasily Vasilievich the Blind, Grand Duke of Moscow, and Maria Yaroslavovna, was born in He was co-regent with his father during Royalty.

Ivan III was at war for 20 out of 43 years of his reign or 47 percent. Vasilii III was at war for 12 out of 28 years of his reign, or 43 percent. His son, Fyedor Ivanovich, was at war for 6 years of his brief reign or 43 percent.

Ivan IV was at war for 37 out of 51 years of his total reign, but most of the peacetime years were during his minority. Ivan IV oversaw huge conquests of neighboring lands, the creation of a national church, and Russia’s emergence as a world power.

Arrogant, handsome, a gifted orator and theologian, Ivan was well educated but cruel, profoundly egotistical yet cowardly, scarred by childhood terrors.

Muscovite Diplomatic Practice in the Reign of Ivan., Robert Croskey (hardcover) $ The Legacy of Tolstoy, Robert Croskey (paperback) $ Modern European History, Robert Croskey (paperback) $ Journey Through Genius, William Dunham (paperback) $ The Mathematical Universe, William Dunham (paperback) $ Grey, Ivan the Terrible,; Vernadsky, op.

cit., IV, A. A. Novosel'skii, Borba Moskovskogo Gosudarstvo s Tatarami v XVII veke, (Struggle of the Muscovite State with the Tatars in the 17th century), Moscow:This book is by far the best on the subject; unfortunately it only has information on the Russian--Tatar wars of the.Tsarist Russia and the Romanov dynasty in fiction: Bernard Malamud's novel The Fixer is about a Jew who is wrongfully accused of a ritual murder of a Christian child in Kiev.

It's a Roman à Clef of a Real Life case from that became an international scandal.; The Scarlet Empress is a fictionalized version of Catherine the Great's rise to power, with particular emphasis on her Really Gets.